A new theory of language evolution

Language—as with most communication systems—likely evolved by means of natural selection. Accounts for the natural selection of language can usually be divided into two scenarios, either of which used in isolation of the other are insufficient to explain the phenomena: (1) there are group benefits from communicating, and (2) there are individual benefits from being a better communicator. In contrast, this paper argues that language emerged during a coevolutionary struggle between parental genomes via genomic imprinting, which is differential gene expression depending on parental origin of the genetic element. It is hypothesized that relatedness asymmetries differentially selected for patrigene-caused language phenotypes (e.g., signals of need) to extract resources from mother early in child development and matrigene-caused language phenotypes (e.g.,  socially transmitted norms) to influence degree of cooperativeness  among kin later in development. Unlike previous theories for language evolution, parental antagonism theory generates testable predictions at the proximate (e.g., neurocognitive areas important for social transmission and language capacities), ontogenetic (e.g., the function of language at different points of development), ultimate (e.g., inclusive fitness), and phylogenetic levels (e.g., the spread of maternally derived brain components in mammals, particularly in the hominin lineage), thus making human capacities for culture more tractable than previously thought.

Enjoy the forthcoming contribution to the study of language evolution (all comments welcome) appearing in the journal Human Biology in 2011.

Link to proof of paper

You may cite the paper as follows:

Brown, W.M. (2011). The parental antagonism theory of language evolution: Preliminary evidence for the proposal. Human Biology, 83 (2), 213-245.

If you are interested in learning more about this idea and feel like travelling to Lausanne, Switzerland Tuesday 21 June 2011, come see my talk on the subject at The University of Lausanne’s Center for Integrative Genomics.

More information below:

http://www.unil.ch/cigsymposium/page60154.html

 

 

 

 

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About sociogenomics

I study behaviour and evolution. This space is about sharing with others notable (and sometimes unexpected) findings that relate to my own scientific interests and research.
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One Response to A new theory of language evolution

  1. Johnc894 says:

    Awesome article post.Thanks Again. Much obliged. fdegbfbkffdd

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